2017 and 2018 were wild years in the crypto world. The number of ICOs exploded and with it the number of altcoins. As of this summer, there are over 2000 cryptocurrencies available. However, many of the new altcoins are weak in terms of creativity and vision. I’ve been tracking ICOs for the past two years and have seen a lot based on recycled technology and unworkable ideas. This, along with the low success rate of startups in general, suggests that many if not most of the new altcoins don’t have a future.

The screenshot below, taken from the site Blockchain.info, might help you put all this information together at a glance. You are looking at a summary of everything that happened when block #490163 was mined. The nonce that generated the "winning" hash was 731511405. The target hash is shown on top. The term "Relayed by: Antpool" refers to the fact that this particular block was completed by AntPool, one of the more successful mining pools. As you see here, their contribution to the Bitcoin community is that they confirmed 1768 transactions for this block. If you really want to see all 1768 of those transactions for this block, go to this page and scroll down to the heading "Transactions."
However, there are also many altcoins that don’t do much interesting at all. The vast majority of altcoins simply tweak some parameters that don’t matter much, or offer something that may sound useful but isn’t. If, for example, an altcoin has a greater total amount of coins, it just means each individual coin is worth less. If an altcoin finds blocks faster, it only means that a transaction requires more confirmations for a similar level of security.
Semantics: “Altcoin” isn’t the name of a cryptocurrency. Rather, the term “altcoin” describes any cryptocurrency alternative to Bitcoin. For example, Ripple, Litecoin, and Ethereum are all technically “altcoins.” With that in mind, people generally use the term to describe coins with lower market capitalizations. On this site we say “major alt” if we mean coins with the top market caps that aren’t Bitcoin, and we say “minor alts” to describe all other cryptos. See a list of altcoins.
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Let's say you had one legit $20 and one really good photocopy of that same $20. If someone were to try to spend both the real bill and the fake one, someone who took the trouble of looking at both of the bills' serial numbers would see that they were the same number, and thus one of them had to be false. What a Bitcoin miner does is analogous to that--they check transactions to make sure that users have not illegitimately tried to spend the same Bitcoin twice. This isn't a perfect analogy--we'll explain in more detail below.
Once again, Bitcoin is dangerously close to the local lows. Since June, we have many times seen that bulls stand up for protection of the benchmark of the cryptocurrency on the falls to around $6100. Meanwhile, reversals to decline on the BTCUSD pair are happening on low levels. Last week, the reach of just $6500 became a turning point to the next reversal. It ...
Altcoins can differ from Bitcoin in a range of ways. Some have a different economic model or a different coin-distribution method, like altcoins that were given away to all citizens of a country. Others employ different proof-of-work mining algorithms, perhaps to resist specialized mining hardware — or maybe they don’t even rely on proof of work at all. Several altcoins offer a more versatile programming language to build applications on top of, while yet others offer more privacy compared to Bitcoin. And there are also altcoins that serve very specific, non-monetary use cases, like domain name registry or data storage pointers.

Today we're going to show you how to mine Monero on a Mining Pool. Monero (XMR) is a Cryptonote algorithm based cryptocurrency, it relies on Ring Signatures in order to provide a certain degree of privacy when making a transaction. Monero is a Proof of Work cryptocurrency that can be miner with computational power from a CPU or GPU. There are currently no ASICs for Monero, which means that anyone with a computer can mine it.
But where are the bitcoins actually stored? After you install one of the two clients above, you can find your bitcoins in a file called wallet.dat. If you use windows this file will be located in the application data section. If your computer gets stolen or lost and you haven’t made a copy of the wallet.dat file you will lose your bitcoins. It is always recommend to backup this file.
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