Altcoins are the new kid on the block and they are as unpredictable as they are exciting. With the biggest altcoins vying to take the top spot from bitcoin, they are all attempting to carve their own niches, with goals nothing short of re-imagining the way we do business, how we send and receive money, and how we transfer assets like properties and cars.
BTC-E does accept US clients. However, starting from the middle of December 2013, the company stopped processing US dollar wires or any wires connected to a US bank. Here is an email reply to a customer’s question on this: ‘’We don’t accept international wire transfers from US Citizens or from US Banks. All transfers from US Citizens or US Bank will be refused by bank.’’
The list goes on with Stellar, Monero, Neo, Ethereum Classic, Tezos, Maker, and BAT all getting good news and positive developments over the past couple of months but not seeing any beneficial price action. It seems that all those that have been burnt during the first half of the year are out of the market and are too afraid to get back in. Cryptocurrency levels now are back to mid-2017 prices and it will take a lot more than positive news to see them surging again.

While the original implementation of the EOS blockchain allow for single-threaded processing, their next phase will introduce a multi-threaded engine. Parallel computing will allow for multiple transactions to occur simultaneously, leading to the ability to scale the platform rapidly, as long as there are developers looking to build on the EOS blockchain.
The earliest notable altcoin, Namecoin, was based on the Bitcoin code and used the same proof-of-work algorithm - and like Bitcoin, Namecoin is limited to 21 million coins. Introduced in April 2011, Namecoin primarily diverged from Bitcoin by making user domains less visible, allowing users to register and mine using their own .bit domains, which was intended to increase anonymity and censorship resistance. 
The above list shows that, fundamentally, yes, anyone can mine cryptocurrencies; however, you must have a keen interest in mining, as well as an appetite to constantly learn and keep up to date on any technology changes. You also have to have the initial budget to be able to set up everything that is required. So, although, technically anyone can mine, realistically, it is not suited to everyone.

Hello everyone. I thought I'd start a new idea ... as this could be the final drop ... I do hate saying "final", but things are setting up for a bottom retest. Let me explain. For over 2 months we've been stuck below 6.8k ... aside from one crazy wick due to tether devaluation on 15 Oct, which I am ignoring. Although this in itself is not really a big deal, ...
Each of the hundreds of crypto coins in existence rely on the core concept of the blockchain. Cryptocurrency was designed to be decentralized, secure and unalterable. So every single transaction is encrypted. Once that encrypted transaction happens it's added to something called a "block" until a fixed number of transactions has been recorded. That block then gets added to a chain -- the blockchain -- which is publicly available.
Bitcoin is a peer-to-peer virtual currency. This means that in order for a transaction to occur, no middle men or central authority is needed. You can send any amount of bitcoins to anyone living anywhere in the world, completely eliminating the need for traditional third parties like banks or money transmitters. The cryptocurrency also allows the bypassing of capital and AML restrictions.
×