Next up is Omise which received a large investment from a Japanese venture capitalist firm this week in order to target enterprise adoption in Southeast Asia as a part of its strategy. Last year this would have sent OMG skyrocketing but it hardly moved. There was a tiny 5% movement after the announcement this week but again the altcoin has fallen back from its weekly high and is a whopping 82% down on its prices six months ago.
Since all of the virtual currencies remain a speculative asset, investors should avoid buying them for their retirement portfolios, says Jason Spatafora, co-founder of Marijuanastocks.com and a Miami-based trader and investor. Cryptocurrencies made up less than 2 percent of his portfolio a few months ago, but he is no longer trading them because of the extreme volatility.
The PayPie app already works seamlessly with QuickBooks Online, and the team is currently working on bringing more third-party platforms into the fold. The timeline in their whitepaper shows enterprise resource planning (ERP) software and application programming interfaces (API) currently in development, which would make it simple to onboard more third parties.
The problem with having an algorithm that is "easy to mine with" (referring to the ability to CPU or GPU mine profitably) is that mining should be hard in order to secure the network. When a mining algorithm is difficult to make ASICs for, there is a higher barrier to entry. A high barrier to entry increases the time that the first group to create ASICs will monopolize the market (and the time the network is vulnerable to a 51% attack from a single source). Many argue that the creators or the developers could simply change the mining algorithm when an ASIC is developed, but this defeats the purpose of decentralized consensus by causing centralization.[1]

The pic above shows a bitcoin long position. Btc.sx has several restrictions that make trading with leverage problematic. The exchange doesn’t support moving the stoploss after entry. When contacted about this, their support team told us that ‘’this feature will be implemented in the next few months’’. Our question is why isn’t it already implemented?
Sure. As discussed, the easiest way to acquire Bitcoin is to buy it on an exchange like Coinbase.com. Alternately, you can always leverage the "pickaxe strategy". This is based on the old saw that during the 1848 California gold rush, the smart investment was not to pan for gold, but rather to make the pickaxes used for mining. Or, to put it in modern terms, invest in the companies that manufacture those pickaxes. In a crypto context, the pickaxe equivalent would be a company that manufactures equpiment used for Bitcoin mining. You can look into companies that make ASICs miners or GPU miners. 
Bitcoin faced extreme headwinds in March when Alphabet's Google (ticker: GOOG, GOOGL) joined Facebook (FB) in banning ads for cryptocurrencies, which lowered liquidity in the market. In an abrupt reversal, Facebook said on June 26 that it would allow some ads for cryptocurrencies, but continues its ban against initial coin offerings and binary options.

BTCUSD update: The hard money continues. We got stopped out of another swing trade long recently which comes with the territory. And we were making every effort to be selective with our entry criteria. Our strategy is not flawed, it is just not the best one for this type of environment. So what is the more effective way to trade the hard money? Before I answer ...
If these cryptocurrencies do have a healthy number of companies producing ASICs and have avoided centralization, they still are using algorithms that take longer to verify than SHA2. Therefore, at best a cryptocurrencies with merely a hashing algorithm change are as good as an exact clone of Bitcoin and not better (however since Bitcoin already exists, an exact clone of Bitcoin has no innovation or value). If the hashing algorithm is slower, as most altcoin algorithms are, it is a disadvantage because it takes more processing time to validate a block and increases the number of organic re-orgs (makes it easier to double spend).
Around 2008, Satoshi Nakamoto founded Bitcoin. At the time, a paper was published through the Cryptography Mailing List. The first Bitcoin software client was released in 2009, and he collaborated with many other developers on the open-source team, careful never to reveal his identity. By 2011, the enigmatic Bitcoin founder had disappeared. His peers understood how valuable this cryptocurrency was, and worked feverishly to develop it to its maximum potential.
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